Creating Time: The Magic of Writing

Well, it’s been quite a while, so I suppose some explanation is in order. I regret losing contact with the handful of loyal readers this blog had, and apologize especially for failing to follow up with some people that I met through it who reached out to me more directly. As I noted in my last apology for a long period of absence from the blogosphere (this must be the second most prevalent genre of blog posts, right after “Hello World – Welcome to my Blog!”), one of my particular challenges has been the elimination in 2012 of the Science, Technology and Society Program at Penn State, where I worked for more than ten years. It’s hard to imagine that I will ever again find an environment as congenial and supportive of my work.

The last year and a half has been about moving on, getting over the loss and building a new life around a new job at Drexel University in Philadelphia. Since my last blog post, there has been the job search and interview, moving  to Philadelphia ahead of my family last January to start the job, countless hours on the Megabus between State College and Philly, selling our house there buying new one here, and moving the family and household here last summer. Until now it’s really been quite impossible to think about the research and writing that this blog represents.

And even now. My official title is associate teaching professor, which means I do a lot of teaching. In my first year here, I taught twelve classes on the quarter system, including the summer quarter. (I believe that would be nine on the semester system).  I’m not complaining. I’ve always loved teaching, and I love it now.

But still, pursuing an ambitious agenda of research and writing with this kind of teaching load is daunting. When I was explaining my new situation to a friend and colleague from Penn State, he said “So you’ve given up the idea of continuing with research then.”

No, no I haven’t. It will be hard, and there is no guarantee I will be able to manage it. And I am ok with failing. But I believe enough in the work I’ve laid out that I’m not ok with failing to try. So, however long the odds, I’m still in the research and writing game.

But given all that, why blog? Why carve time for this out of the precious little time I have for research and writing? For me, blogging is a way to stay connected to the world, to commit to paying attention and formulating thoughts about the things that matter to me beyond the quotidian demands of my life.

Blogging is for me also a means of developing the discipline and practice of writing – to train my mind to be as motivated by the prospect of filling a blank page as it is by the flash of a facebook or twitter notification, or the prospect of spending an evening passively soaking up a movie. Without that discipline, no amount of time will be sufficient for getting this work done. With it, I may find an abundance of time in the cracks and crevices of a demanding life. My theory is that blogging as a regular writing commitment will not just be a slice of the pie, but a way of making the pie bigger.

Maybe that’s magical thinking, but my hope is that it’s part of the real magic of writing.

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